Examples of reports of Human Skeletal Analysis studies

Follow up to introduction Anthropology blog post. 

As part of my Applied Sciences by Research MSc I had undertake an Extended Dissertation along with supporting modules. I conducted research on a collection of Roman human remains as part of the MSc. When search as part of a dissertation based on human skeletal remains you are expected to be thorough and extract as much information about the individuals as possible. I had a whole year for my research I was told to study a minimum of twenty aiming for twenty-five skeletons. In the end I analysed twenty-seven individuals made up of twenty four adults and three infants. With at least two days per individual to carry out  the human skeletal analysis. Also, four of the individuals I arranged to be loaned temporally to the university from the museum I was carrying out the research at to conduct a nice detailed analysis on the remains due the native of their burials. Primarily for the examination of cut-marks. It should be noted that under certain contracts for archeology or anthropology when employed in a business environment you may have little as an hour per individual to index  them. Which can lead to vital information being missed. In support of the research I had to write the background of the remains from the historical and archaeological context they were from and to discuss the nature of the burials in relation to other recorded and studies from the same historical era.

I enclosed links to the finished dissertation which gives an overview of anthropological study can look like. Also, shorter journal styled article based on material from the main dissertation which was part of the requirements of the MSc.

MSc dissertation
Journal style article on deviant burials
I have decided to upload links to them for additional information and to give examples of an anthropologists work.

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